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Police prepare for a summer of crimes after being locked up and expect an increase in violence and gang activity on Britain's streets as restrictions are eased

  • Young men from work and public gatherings are likely to result in a & # 39; toxic mix & # 39;
  • With police, security for an increase in federal activities is also resumed as a gang terrace
  • Police forces are discussing how to confront the issue when lockdown is lifted
  • Crime figures could also spike when offenses at lockdown come to light

Police have said they are concerned that an increase in violent crime by younger unemployed men and gangs that are not seeking to recover their turf will follow the relaxation of lockdown measures.

In & # 39; toxic mix & # 39; of young men from work, public meetings are allowed again and later, the opening of licensed venues such as pubs and clubs, police have taken steps to prepare them for the days when the UK's restrictions before lockdown begins to lift.

London police are also said to have forces for an increase in gang-related activity, such as drugs and knife crime, to grapple with gangs to gain control of their territory after weeks of "streets".

London police, pictured from an area in Canning Town following a murder on April 29, have said that violence against violence may increase after the "lockdown" in the city is lifted

Speaking to The Times, West Midland Police Commissioner David James said: & # 39; I'm afraid we may have to deal with a summer vacation wave. Young men from work, reopened locations, and large groups that do not meet are a toxic mix for crime.

& # 39; I am particularly concerned about crimes of public order, anti-social behavior and violence with alcohol, & # 39; he added.

He said that when there were hundreds of thousands of young men in the summer, e West Midlands would be without finding a job, there could be many young men on the street with nothing to do. This often results in & # 39; crime of various kinds & # 39 ;.

Furthermore, reopening pubs could also see people more than drinking, he warned, which could prove problematic if people became potentially festive moods.

Another police officer, Ken Marsh, who is the president of the Metropolitan Police Federation, said that the & # 39; r & # 39; massive concern & # 39; was among the police over a rise of & # 39; e post-lockdown in crime with knife and violence in London.

& # 39; Bans are not out of the virus at the moment, but eventually they will want to retake their position, Marsh told The Times. & # 39; We've seen a big drop in & # 39; a knife crime. But when lockdown is over, drug trafficking and gang fights will resume. & # 39;

The UK has seen lesser reported crime during the lockdown because people have remained inside, and police have been instructed to impose restrictions by the government. Image: Metropolitan Police speaks with solar boats in Greenwich Park

The UK has seen lesser reported crime during the lockdown because people have remained inside, and police have been instructed to impose restrictions by the government. Image: Metropolitan Police speaks with solar boats in Greenwich Park

Marsh said the Metropolitan Police had already discussed how to best confront the issue, and to "see the government continue to see how it can safely lift the country from lockdown."

The impact that the coronavirus has on the economy could well result in a more & # 39; volatile and agitated & # 39; society, said Paul Griffith, president of & # 39; e Association of Police Superintendents.

He explained that as in all cases of economic downturn and deprivation, there is a risk level of crime and concern will increase, and that there would be a natural rise in crime such as pubs, bars, clubs and other re-open licensed licenses, and if public meetings were allowed again.

Police are also concerned that if licensed premises reopen, there may also be an increase in violent and anti-social behavior. Image: A pub in north London is bounded during the lockdown

Police are also concerned that if licensed premises reopen, there may also be an increase in violent and anti-social behavior. Image: A pub in north London is bounded during the lockdown

He added that possible figures of crime could also spike post-lockdown as evidence of domestic violence, child sexual exploitation and other crimes committed during the lowdown.

The economic consequences of the coronavirus could also lead to more desperate crimes, such as theft, to feed themselves, and Andy Cooke, chief constable of Merseyside Police, argued that unemployment would be more likely to cause this than violent crime.

& # 39; In recession, you will see an increase in the lower end of crime. For example, purchasing crime can go up in order to & # 39; steal people to feed themselves, & # 39; he said.

Cooke said all police forces have the & # 39; common sense & # 39; take action on crime prevention plans so that restrictions are not relaxed.

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