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Hydrogel patch for phone batteries converts waste heat to electricity

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Engineers develop a new & # 39; hydrogel & # 39; material that can overheat phones and computers and convert waste heat into electricity

  • Thin hydrogel film straps on phone batteries to convert waste heat to electricity
  • The new polymer-based film transfers electrons as heated to generate power
  • Water in the hydrogel then evaporates to cool the patch has a cooling effect

Engineers have created a cooling hydrogel material that can convert excessive heat from electronic devices into electricity.

The thin hydrogel film, which consists of a polymer and water, can draw heat from the batteries of smartphones, tablets and computers, so they do not go too high.

Investigators tested the film on a battery of a mobile phone and found that the temperature dropped by 68 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius).

Some of the waste heat was also converted into electricity that could not be used to power the device.

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The hydrogel (pictured in a petri dish) can cool electronics and generate electricity from their waste heat. Scale bar: 0.39 inches (2 cm)

& # 39; The reduced working temperature ensures safe operation of & # 39; e battery, and the energy that is being harvested is enough to control the battery or the cooling system, & # 39; said Dr Xuejiao Hu of & # 39; e Wuhan University in China.

Excessive use of electronic devices can cause them to overheat, which can slow them down, damage their components or even explode or catch fire.

The most high profile of these was the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 in 2016, which had to be recalled due to a defect that generated excessive battery heat and burst into flames.

Researchers say their new device, which is yet to be marketed, is the first for both cool appliances and convert waste heat into electricity.

The heat generated by batteries, lights and processors reduces the efficiency, reliability and service life of devices – and wastes energy.

The hydrogel (seen here as a beige strip) attaches to the device's battery. As the hydrogen patch is heated, ions transfer into gel electrons between electrodes, and generate electricity

The hydrogel (seen here as a beige strip) attaches to the device's battery. As the hydrogen patch is heated, ions transfer into gel electrons between electrodes, and generate electricity

The hydrogel could often save smartphone users from having to buy new devices regularly, while being more environmentally friendly.

The thermogalvanic hydrogel, which is attached in a device to the battery, changes its structure in response to temperature.

It consists of a framework of polyacrylamide – an organic polymer currently used as a suspending, lubricant, and oil recovery agent – that is infused with water and ions.

As the hydrogen patch warms up, two of the ions – ferricyanide and ferrocyanide – transfer electrons between electrodes, and then generate electricity.

Meanwhile, water evaporates in & # 39; hydrogel, which has a cooling effect on & # 39; a patch.

After use, the hydrogel regenerates itself by absorbing water from the surrounding air.

Excessive use of electronic devices can cause them to get too high, which can slow them down, damage their components or even explode or catch fire

Excessive use of electronic devices can cause them to get too high, which can slow them down, damage their components or even explode or catch fire

Water in & # 39; hydrogel can even adaptively escape from & # 39; e hydrogel and re-enter through an evaporation and absorption cycle – a temperature-controlled & # 39; thermodynamic & # 39; cycle.

To demonstrate the new material, the researchers hung it on a phone battery during rapid discharge.

Some of the waste heat was converted to 5 microwatts (μW) of electricity around the temperature of & # 39; low battery.

The findings were published in the American Chemical Society Nano Letters journal.

SMARTPHONE BATTERIES CAN EXPLODE BECAUSE THEY GOVERN

Lithium batteries provide the most modern, portable gadgets – from smartphones to laptops and handheld gaming devices.

The batteries are incredibly safe, but they are known to explode if they are defective or overheated.

Rechargeable batteries store an incredible amount of power in a small space, and are designed to release that power for extended periods of time.

A faulty battery may lose its ability to provide controlled power, which does not release this energy at the same time, which can cause an explosion.

Bad batteries fall broadly into three categories.

Some, like the infamous Galaxy Note 7 battery, come with a design flaw which means they can't properly store the charger.

Errors can also be fixed during normal use, for example, if a device is splashed with water or left in the sun for too long.

Counterfeit products are also a common source of battery explosions because they are designed and built on cheap ones – often ignoring safety regulations.

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Living alone makes over-50s 30% more likely to be treated in a hospital for respiratory illnesses

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Data from nearly 4,500 50s in the United Kingdom found one in nine people in the & # 39; e time in & # 39; hospital with respiratory problems.

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Four bats that have been discovered in Africa are & # 39; sisters & # 39; of species from which COVID-19 originated

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Four siblings of the species that are thought to be the original source of the novel coronavirus are found in Africa.

The previously undiscovered animals are considered & # 39; sister & # 39; species for the horse bat, which is probably the origin of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that caused the COVID-19 pandemic.

Bats act as reservoirs for coronaviruses and are immune to them, but have the ability to spread them.

Researchers said that studying the four new species and the viruses they harbored, scientists and medics could help prepare for any future outbreaks.

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Researchers found that the leaf nose bat (pictured) consists of eight distinct lineages; three of these (including this bat) seem to be new to science

The previously undiscovered bat species are closely related to the horse bat (pictured). This winged mammal is thought to be a reservoir for the SARS CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19

The previously undiscovered bat species are closely related to the horse bat (pictured). This winged mammal is thought to be a reservoir for the SARS CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19

How the new coronavirus spread from bats and infected people of 2.5 million

Bats are robust creatures that are known to harbor coronaviruses reservoirs.

Most of these tribes are unable to make the transition from one species to another.

However, a new coronavirus emerged that was not able to flourish as a host.

But it is thought that the SARS CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19 and is the root of & # 39; global pandemic, was first passed on from bats to an intermediate host.

Scientific studies assessed the genetic strain of the virus because it originated in China and believe that this animal was a pangolin.

However, there is much uncertainty among scientists as to what the intermediary may be. It could be pangolins, but it could also be cats, buffalo, cattle, goats, sheep and pigeons. according to one study.

Some experts dispute the existence of an intermediary at all, indicating that the virus could have jumped directly from a horse bat into humans.

But human-animal contact allowed the virus to infect the first person in Wuhan, China, ground zero of the outbreak.

The virus can also be transmitted from human to human, which has seen rapid propagation across the globe, with more than 2.5 million confirmed cases worldwide.

Research into its spread between humans and across humans has found that it is rapidly mutating and several files of the coronavirus now exist in the world.

One study from Cambridge University researchers found that three types of deadly coronavirus spread throughout the world.

Analysis of strains showing type A – the original virus that jumped bats via pangolins to humans – was not the most common in China.

Instead, the ground zero of the pandemic was mainly hit by Type B, which was as far back as Christmas Eve.

Results showed that type A was most common in Australia and the US, which included more than 400,000 COVID-19 cases.

Two-thirds of US monsters were type A – but infected patients mostly came from & # 39; a West Coast, and not New York.

In the case of COVID-19, the new coronavirus jumped out of a chicken coop in Wuhan and infected an intermediary, believed to be a pangolin or shrewd dog, before ending in humans.

The four & # 39; sister & # 39; species are called leafnose bats and were identified by scientists using genetic analysis.

The specimens were all in a museum, but were originally collected in Africa.

The new bats belong to a group of scientifically known as the Hipposideridae, and are also found throughout Asia and Australasia.

They get their name from bizarre flaps of skin on their faces that will help them catch insects and act as radar shells for their echo location call.

Lead author Dr Bruce Patterson, curator of mammals at the Field Museum, Chicago, said: & # 39; With COVID-19, we have a virus running amok in & # 39; e human population.

& # 39; It originated in a horse head in China. There are 25 or 30 types of horse bats in China, and no one can determine which one was there. We owe it to ourselves to learn more about her and her siblings. & # 39;

Scientists who do not define the four types of bat say they are sure that none of the new types of diseases carry that are problematic for human health.

Researchers at the Chicago Field Museum collaborate with colleagues at Maasai Mara University of Kenya and the National Museums of Kenya.

In a study, published today in a special pandemic issue of Zookeys magazine, they said the leaf nodes remained in sight.

They are equal, and yet distinct, from pre-existing species that have not been identified. This, the researchers say, is a good indicator of their close relationship with other assets.

The discovery of & # 39; bats is so short that they have yet to be given specific names and are only mentioned by the generic term & # 39; leaf-nosed & # 39; which is the umbrella term for the animal family to which they belong.

Their discovery is particularly important in light of the COVID-19 crisis, the international team reports.

But although bats are thought to be the origin of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers are urging the public to think rationally and not to condemn bats as inherently filthy as infected animals.

Explains Dr Patterson: & # 39; All organisms have viruses. The roses in your garden have viruses.

& # 39; We worry about viruses when it comes to flu and pandemics, but viruses are part of & # 39; e nature and are as far back as we go. And many viruses are harmless. & # 39;

Bats get a lot of infections without suffering from any serious detrimental effects, because they have exceptionally fast metabolism and robust DNA, which is unable to repair any damage.

People do not have these capabilities.

Images that appear on Twitter show soup with a bat

Bats are used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a series of illnesses, including cough, malaria and gonorrhea

Images appeared this year on Twitter earler who made soup with a bat. Bats are used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a series of illnesses, including cough, malaria and gonorrhea. Bats have been confirmed to be the most likely source of infection

Pictured, another of the & # 39; s new bat types. Discovery of bats is so recent that they have yet to give specific names and are only mentioned by the generic term leafnose that does not refer to the corresponding umbrella term for the family of which the animals belong

Pictured, another of the & # 39; s new bat types. Discovery of bats is so recent that they have yet to receive specific names and are only mentioned by the generic term leafnose that does not refer to the corresponding umbrella term for the family of which the animals belong

Members of a third new species. A colony of what appears to be a new species of Hipposideros is pictured at an abandoned gold mine in Western Kenya

Members of a third new species. A colony of what appears to be a new species of Hipposideros is pictured at an abandoned gold mine in Western Kenya

Large colonies cuddle together and this allows the virus to spread through the group. Meanwhile, their ability to fly has a wide geographical reach.

Despite this, flags are exclusive creatures and prevent active interactions with humans.

Dr. Terry Demos, a postdoctoral researcher and lead author of & # 39; the study, also believes that the & # 39; The new bats and the virus kept in the cold helps to compare future outbreaks with COVID-19's current disease.

He said, & # 39; Except when you try to search for bats, whether they are criminalizing or killing them, it is very, very unlikely that they will infect you.

& # 39; Leaf bats carry coronaviruses – not the strain that currently has humans.

& # 39; But this is certainly not the last time a virus from a wild mammal is transmitted to humans.

& # 39; If we have better knowledge of what these batons are, we will be better prepared than that

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Amazing drone footage shows the removal of blue whales that swim to the surface

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Blue whales swim to the surface to feed krill, and it does not help them save energy, according to a new study that contained huge drone recordings of mammals.

& # 39; Oregon State University experts found that nutrition on the surface of & # 39; Ocean plays an important role in hunting for food among New Zealand's blue whales.

Blue whales are the largest mammals on earth and must carefully balance the cost of energy obtained from food with the cost of energy used to obtain food.

Researchers said that marine mammals feed for krill in areas where they are tightly packed and found near the surface of the water to cut their divide.

The Oregon team found that the blue whales are doing this to save the energy costs of feeding such as diving, holding their breath or opening their mouths.

Adding to the challenge, their prowess are small and so they need large volumes of & # 39; find and eat small crustaceans to make any energetic progress.

Study author Dr Leigh Torres, an assistant professor at & # 39; Oregon State University, said: & # 39; People thinking about whales need to dive deep to get to the densest prey patches.

& # 39; But if they can find their prey in shallow waters, it is actually more profitable to feed near the surface, & # 39; said Torres.

Blue whales swim to the surface to feed krill, and it does not help them save energy, according to a new study that involved huge drone recordings of mammals

& # 39; In this population of whales in New Zealand, they fought more in areas where their prey was close and shallow.

& # 39; Their dikes were relatively short, and they fought more on the surface, requiring less energy. & # 39;

Tags posted on blue whales record where they travel and their diving patterns – and give researchers most of their knowledge about the marine creatures.

Until now, surface feeding was not so well understood – partly because it is more difficult to analyze tag data and quantify the size of prey patches on the surface of the water.

During a field research trip to study blue whales off the coast of New Zealand, Dr Torres and her team observed overfishing of their boat.

They were also able to capture drone recordings from the food used in & # 39; the study.

Blue whales are the largest mammals on earth and grow up to a maximum of 98 feet

Blue whales grow to a whopping 98 feet and weigh up to 190 tons.

Not only are they the largest mammals on Earth, but they are the second largest animal to have ever existed.

The marine mammal has a long and slender body and is part of the sequence of bales.

Blue whales are listed as endangered in terms of conservation status due to hunting for whaling.

They are found in & # 39; eastern northern Pacific, central northern Pacific, northern Atlantic, and Antarctic oceans, as well as in & # 39; a neighborhood of New Zealand, the northern Indian Ocean and Chile.

They can swim at about 4.6 miles per hour, but average about 1.68 miles per hour, but if they hunt, they can reach up to 30 miles per hour.

The researchers noted that the density of krill patches was closer to the surface of the water and the likely reason the whales were picking those areas to feed.

Findings showed that New Zealand blue whales were relatively short dive times in general of about 2.5 minutes – compared to other blue whale populations that could see diving times of more than 10 minutes.

The dive time of New Zealand blue whales slowed down even more – to less than two minutes – when surface feeding was detected by drone recordings.

The video shows the mammal feeding process, including decision making about whether or not to place krill at the surface of the ocean or not.

It also gave researchers another source of data to describe surface feeding behavior in marine mammals.

Co-author Dawn Barlow, a doctoral student in Dr. Torres's lab, said the recordings made a hole in his & # 39; e scientists follow about understanding surfaces.

The footage showed investigators how the whale used his right eye to direct the prey before he went for the kill.

They were also able to quantify the distance from the whale to the prey and measure how wide the whale opened its mouth to graze.

Blue whales are the largest mammals on earth and must carefully balance the cost of energy they receive from food with the cost of energy used in obtaining food.

Blue whales are the largest mammals on earth and must carefully balance the cost of energy they receive from food with the cost of energy used in obtaining food.

The video also showed the decision of & # 39; the whale to & # 39; turning one side to the other to better capture the krill.

& # 39; The video shows us some really cool kinematics and coordination of body movement described by the whale that we couldn't see before, & # 39; said Torres.

& # 39; The recordings also showed us the proai response in new way. We can see when the krill starts to flee when the whale arrives, which is really amazing.

& # 39; At the fastest speed and acceleration of & # 39; a whale starts the krill just eight tenths of a second before the whale strikes the & # 39; krill patch. & # 39;

Although the researchers had footage of surface of only one whale, the footage included four encounters between those whales and surface prey patches.

It provides insight into decision making by the whale in response to & # 39; size and orientation of & # 39; a proai patches.

& # 39; These recordings highlight the value of using drones for studying and observing whales, & # 39; said Torres.

& # 39; Drone recordings can be a good addition to data collected from tags for studying whaling surface behavior. & # 39;

Findings were published in the journal Peer.

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Butterfly charity asks British public to report views of coronavirus virus

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Butterfly charity asks British public to report gardens during the coronavirus lockon to help measure climate change impacts

  • Butterfly Conservation has been researching UK moths and butterflies for 50 years
  • The fight against COVID-19 stops experts and volunteers from surveillance
  • Those with access to outdoor spaces are asked to report all observations online
  • Experts are unsure how the warming climate will change the life of butterflies
  • Observations from Scotland and the north of England are mainly sought
  • Here you can help people who are not affected by Covid-19

A British butterfly company has urged the public to report garden insects & # 39; insects during the coronavirus lockon to help measure climate change impacts.

Butterfly Conservation has conducted extensive research on & # 39; populations of & # 39; e butterflies and moths of Britain for the last 50 years.

Normally, the scientists and volunteers of the & # 39; wild organization would now go out and oversee nature reserves and the & # 39; t United Kingdom.

However, the restrictions put in place to combat COVID-19 mean that the charity is now turning to members of the public to help them collect data.

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A British butterfly company has urged the public to report garden insects & # 39; insects during the coronavirus lockon to help measure climate change impacts

& # 39; Study of alternate flight times and locations of butterfly species in & # 39; t The United Kingdom is vital to understanding & # 39; the impacts of climate change on our native wildlife & # 39 ;, said Richard Assoc Fox, associate director of Butterfly Conservation.

& # 39; We know that climate change for some species has helped raise numbers, while it has had a negative effect for others, but there is still so much to learn. & # 39;

& # 39; We can't collect data in our usual ways this spring, so we need the help of anyone who's home, with a garden or outdoor space, in & # 39; e unlock period. & # 39;

& # 39; We know that climate change birds earlier in & # 39; spring and some are spreading to new parts of the UK. We need you to tell us where and when & # 39; you saw them, & # 39; Mr Fox went on.

Studies have shown that Britain's warming climate has caused butterflies to fly earlier in the year – and in some cases produce more generations each year – but it remains unclear how the changes to the insects in the long term term will affect.

& # 39; Keep an appearance in your garden for butterflies such as the Brimstone, Comma, Speckled Wood, Holly Blue, and Orange-tip, & # 39; said Mr Fox.

& # 39; We want your records, and know when & # 39; you put them on & # 39; saw a wing. & # 39;

'You never know what you might see. There has even been a spread of Painted Lady butterfly sightings across the country last week. & # 39;

& # 39; This species is a migrant from warmer parts of Europe, which usually arrives at the end of May or early June. & # 39;

Researchers and volunteers with Butterfly Conservation have conducted extensive research on the & # 39; population of & # 39; e butterflies and moths of Britain.

Researchers and volunteers with Butterfly Conservation have conducted extensive research on the & # 39; population of & # 39; e butterflies and moths of Britain.

Normally, the scientists and volunteers of the & # 39; wild organization would now go out and oversee nature reserves and the & # 39; t United Kingdom. However, the restrictions put in place to combat COVID-19 mean that the charity is now turning to members of the public to help them collect data

Normally, the scientists and volunteers of the & # 39; wild organization would now go out and oversee nature reserves and the & # 39; t United Kingdom. However, the restrictions put in place to combat COVID-19 mean that the charity is now turning to members of the public to help them collect data

& # 39; If you live in certain areas, especially in Northern England and Scotland, we are particularly interested in your observations, & # 39; said Mr Fox.

This, he explained, is to & # 39; many butterflies – including the Brimstone, Speckled Wood and Orange tip – & # 39; spread north, colonizing areas where they & # 39; re not previously encountered. & # 39;

& # 39; The Comma, for example, has spread hundreds of miles to the north since the 1970s. Just this week, we got an observation from a garden in Fife, which was the first Comma the volunteer had seen there in 60 years. & # 39;

However, he added, despite where & # 39; people are, & # 39; every recording is important to our work to preserve UK butterflies and we would love to see the audience behind us. & # 39;

Members of the public can report their views on & # 39; Butterfly Conservation's website.

YOU MIGHT HAVE THESE BUTTERFLIES IN YOUR Garden

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New snake species named after Harry Potter character Salazar Slytherin

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New species of green cone fisherman discovered in India is named after Hogwarts founder Salazar Slytherin from Harry Potter series whose domestic animal is a snake

  • The new Salazar snake species was discovered in Aranachal Pradesh, India
  • Researchers say little is known about the biodiversity of the Himalayan region
  • Salazar's pit viper is predominantly green and venomous, but men have a red stripe

A kind of green pit snake of slime discovered in India is named after the character Salazar Slytherin from JK Rowling's Harry Potter series.

The green poisonous snake is named Trimeresurus salazar after the founder of Hogwarts House, but will simply be known as the pit wiper of Salazar.

In & # 39; Harry Potter stories, Salazar Slytherin was one of & # 39; the four founders of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry – he founded the Slytherin House.

Hands of Salazar pit-adder species have an orange-red stripe along the head and more teeth than other pit-vipers.

A kind of green pit snake of slime discovered in India is named after the character Salazar Slytherin from the Harry Potter series of JK Rowling

Slytherin house has a snake on its womb and founder Salazar Slytherin could talk to snakes

Slytherin house has a snake on its womb and founder Salazar Slytherin could talk to snakes

The green venomous snake is named Trimeresurus salazar after the founder of the Hogwarts house, but will simply be known as the pit viper of Salazar

The green venomous snake is named Trimeresurus salazar after the founder of the Hogwarts house, but will simply be known as the pit viper of Salazar

Researchers from the National Center for Biological Sciences and Bombay Natural History Society found the snake in Arunachal Pradesh, India.

Slytherin had the ability to talk to snakes – a rare skill called Parselmouth – and the symbol of his Hogwarts home was a snake.

In the second book, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, a giant snake called the Basilically terrorized Hogwarts students and was said to be in possession of Slytherin.

The new snake is the latest in a long line of & # 39; fantastic beasts & # 39; named after characters as objects in the Harry Potter series.

There is a black-hat spider and a crab named Harryplax severus.

The new pitfalls of Salazar – in the genus Trimeresurus – are charismatic poisonous snakes, spread widely across East and Southeast Asia.

The species that belong to the genus are morphologically cryptic, which makes it difficult to distinguish them in the field, & # 39; according to author Zeeshan Mirza.

A morphologically cryptic refers to two or more creatures that do not look alike but are actually different species.

& # 39; As a result, their true diversity could be underestimated, & # 39; said Mirza.

Researchers from the National Center for Biological Sciences and Bombay Natural History Society found the snake in Arunachal Pradesh, India

Researchers from the National Center for Biological Sciences and Bombay Natural History Society found the snake in Arunachal Pradesh, India

The species that belong to the genus are morphologically cryptic, which makes it difficult to distinguish them in the field, & # 39; according to author Zeeshan Mirza

The species that belong to the genus are morphologically cryptic, which makes it difficult to distinguish them in the field, & # 39; according to author Zeeshan Mirza

Arunachal Pradesh, where the new species was found, belongs to the Himalayan biodiversity hotspot, according to the research team.

This is already the second species discovered during an expedition to Arunachal Pradesh, Mirza said, adding that it reflects poorly on existing biodiversity documentation on north-eastern India.

"Future dedicated research conducted throughout northeastern India will help to document biodiversity, which is threatened by numerous development activities that include road broadening, agriculture and hydroelectric projects," he said.

The findings were published in the journal Zoosystematics and Evolution.

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