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Let's face it – you won't go to any beautiful parties as long as the social distance is in force, so why not cut your mothballed Vera Wangs to make face masks?

Scientists have proven that homemade masks made of cotton combined with natural silk or chiffon provide the best protection against coronavirus.

Chiffon – used to fashion fashion couture – can suck 99 percent of drops from coughs and sneezes when placed between two layers of cotton.

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Scientists have proven that homemade masks made of cotton combined with natural silk or chiffon provide the best protection against coronavirus. Chiffon – used to fashion fashion couture – can filter 99 percent of drops of coughs and sneezes if placed between two layers of cotton (stock image)

& # 39; One layer of a tightly woven cotton sheet combined with two layers of polyester spandex chiffon – a high fabric commonly used in evening dresses – filtered most aerosol particles, & # 39; said paper author Supratik Guha of & # 39; the University of Chicago.

Researchers found that they are almost as good as the physicians used by doctors and nurses in hospitals – which are in high short supply.

The British public is said to be wearing face masks at work and on public transport, after scientists told the government they could help spread the coronavirus.

Replacing the chiffon with natural silk or flannel, or simply using a cotton quilt with cotton-polyester batting, yielded similar results.

& # 39; Tightly woven fabrics, such as cotton, can act as a mechanical barrier to particles, & # 39; said Professor Guha.

& # 39; Substances that have a static charge, such as certain types of chiffon and natural silk, serve as an electrostatic barrier. & # 39;

This explains why & # 39; they work so well in combination, the team report,

But even the smallest gap between the face diminishes its efficiency by half or more – emphasizing the importance of a well-tailored mask, Professor Guha warned.

Virus particles are small, ranging from 0.1–0.3 microns – invisible to the naked eye – but surgical masks are designed to prevent them from flowing in and out of the mouth.

However, such protective wear is a brief offer – and are reserved for health care workers who do not treat patients with COVID-19.

Correctly made, a homemade mask can reduce the transmission of the carrier to others – and vice versa – by producing the drops and syringes that are produced when we breathe, cough or sneeze.

Virus particles are small, ranging from 0.1–0.3 microns - invisible to the naked eye - but surgical masks are designed to prevent them from flowing in and out of the mouth. Such protective wear, however, is a short offer - and is reserved for healthcare workers, pictured

Virus particles are small, ranging from 0.1–0.3 microns – invisible to the naked eye – but surgical masks are designed to prevent them from flowing in and out of the mouth. Such protective wear, however, is a short offer – and is reserved for healthcare workers, pictured

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended that people wear face masks when in public.

& # 39; Because & # 39; hospital masks are bad and should be reserved for healthcare workers, many people create their own coverage, & # 39; said Professor Guha.

& # 39; A combination of cotton with natural silk or chiffon can effectively filter aerosol particles – if the fit is good. & # 39;

COVID-19 mainly spreads through the respiratory droplets that are released when an infected cough, sneeze, speak or breathe.

These droplets form on a wide scale in size, but the smallest – called aerosols – can easily slip through the opening between certain cloth fibers.

This has led some people to question whether masks can actually help spread disease – yet growing body of evidence suggests they can.

& # 39; Tightly woven fabrics, such as cotton, can act as a mechanical barrier to particles, & # 39; said Professor Guha. & # 39; Substances that have a static charge, such as certain types of chiffon and natural silk, serve as an electrostatic barrier. & # 39; This explains why they & # 39; ll work so well in combination

& # 39; Tightly woven fabrics, such as cotton, can act as a mechanical barrier to particles, & # 39; said Professor Guha. & # 39; Substances that have a static charge, such as certain types of chiffon and natural silk, serve as an electrostatic barrier. & # 39; This explains why they & # 39; ll work so well in combination

Chiffon filters 80-99 percent of & # 39; drops, depending on their size - with a performance & # 39; near that & # 39; of a hospital mask, said Professor Guha (stock image)

Chiffon filters 80-99 percent of & # 39; drops, depending on their size – with a performance & # 39; near that & # 39; of a hospital mask, said Professor Guha (stock image)

Professor Guha and colleagues analyzed the ability of ordinary substances, alone or in combination, to filter aerosols that are similar in size to respiratory droplets.

They used an aerosol mixing chamber to produce particles ranging from 10 nanometers to 6 μm microns in diameter.

A fan blew the aerosol over several cloth samples during a flow corresponding to the respiration of a person at rest.

The team then measured the number and size of particles in the air before and after transmitting the dust.

The chiffon filters 80-99 percent of & # 39; drops, depending on their size – with a performance & # 39; near that & # 39; of a personal protective equipment hospital mask, said Professor Guha.

Masks must completely cover the nose and mouth. When measuring for a pattern, it should be from & # 39; the top of & # 39; e nose – extend as close as possible to the eyes without obstructing vision – to below the chin.

Masks should cover the face side-to-side and well past the opening of the mouth. All edges must be checked for holes.

These can be terminated by clipping and supporting, taping or tightening the fabric to make a pleat like a dart.

Masks should stay in position and fit comfortably with ties or elastic earlobes. If the mask is too tight or loose, the wearer can continuously adjust the mask, forget the exhortation – & # 39; Don't touch your face! & # 39;

The straps and loops should also be the mechanism for removing the mask so that the front of the mask can be infected.

& # 39; Our studies also implicate that holes, caused by an incorrect fit of the mask, can result in more than 60 percent decrease in & # 39; a filter effectiveness, & # 39; said Professor Guha.

& # 39; In summary, we find that the use of cloth masks can potentially provide important protection against the transfer of particles in the aerosol size range. & # 39;

The full findings of & # 39; the study were published in the journal ACS Nano.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) coronavirus

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