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Fleets of empty cruise factories and cargo ships collect from the Isle of Wight down to anchor, so that berths in nearby ports are prioritized during the coronavirus pandemic

  • Crusaders have begun to find difficulty with lying sites since the pandemic
  • The area south of the Isle of Wight is out of the way of major shipping lanes
  • The Department of Transportation said freight is currently being prioritized
  • Here you can help people who are not affected by Covid-19

A fleet of empty cruise lines and cargo ships is forced to anchor off the Isle of Wight to avoid busy shipping lanes, so that free berths at nearby ports are prioritized for cargo ships during the coronavirus pandemic.

Since the crisis, cruise ships have had difficulty finding berths at ports throughout the country and are now anchoring in safe locations off the coast, including the Isle of Wight.

The area south of the island is often used by ships when the weather is particularly severe, and is also out of the way of major shipping lanes.

A spokesman for the Department of Transportation (DfT) confirmed that certain ships have been given higher priority because of the crisis and cruise ships are currently low priority, so they do not carry passengers.

The cruise liners – which run with minimal crew members – wait for space at nearby Southampton or Portsmouth Ports.

Currently, the Marella Discovery 2 and Marella Explorer are docked just off the coast. The Marella Explorer 2 was also spotted in the area last week, but has now continued.

The Marella Discovery 2 has dropped anchor and is waiting today on & # 39; the coast of & # 39; an Isle of Wight

The Marella Explorer that sits off the coast of the Isle of Wight today. Cruise liners use the area of ​​the island regularly, while waiting for berths in nearby ports

The Marella Explorer that sits off the coast of the Isle of Wight today. Cruise liners use the area of ​​the island regularly, while waiting for berths in nearby ports

One of the RoRo vessels used by the logistics and shipping company Wallenius Wilhelmsen

One of the RoRo vessels used by the logistics and shipping company Wallenius Wilhelmsen

It comes after both P&O Cruises and Cunard – two major operators – extended the suspension of sails to at least the end of July.

All cruise ships operated by large companies have stopped commercial travel.

In recent weeks, many were forced to cut their routes short, and some were left in limbo when ports refused to let them in for fear of increasing the spread of coronavirus.

P&O Cruises President Paul Ludlow said: & # 39; With current locking in place and government guidelines around the world that advise against travel, it is necessary to extend the break in our operations for all sails by July 31 2020.

& # 39; We regret that we are currently unable to give our guests great holidays, but we will do so as soon as worldwide guidelines allow. & # 39;

A commercial ship awaits & # 39; the morning of & # 39; a coast of the Isle of Wight, waiting for a key

A commercial ship awaits & # 39; the morning of & # 39; a coast of the Isle of Wight, waiting for a key

A large commercial ship waiting for the coast of the Isle of Wight today

A large commercial ship waiting for the coast of the Isle of Wight today

A large commercial ship waiting for the coast of the Isle of Wight today

A large commercial ship waiting for the coast of the Isle of Wight today

Much like airline companies, travel restrictions have resulted in a collapse of passengers for cruise lines, with suggestions some may require further government assistance.

Yesterday it was revealed that the owner of P&O Ferries is pleading with the government for a £ 150 million suspension – about & # 39; t preparing to give shareholders around £ 270 million.

DP World in Dubai says that P&O, which & # 39; s started with ferry services in & # 39; United Kingdom in & # 39; began in the late 1960s, needing emergency cash to prevent collapse.

But critics said the company should instead stop & # 39; eradicate & # 39; money on payouts from investors and beat up his millionaire bosses.

It comes just a day after it was revealed that passengers will have to undergo strict medical checks when cruise ships return to service.

P&O plans to develop a series of & # 39; strict measures & # 39; to ensure they follow international health guidelines when restarting operations once the coronavirus pandemic subsides.

Other changes that are being considered include reducing the capacity of ships, scrapping self-service buffets and implementing one-way systems on board.

A large commercial ship waiting for the coast of the Isle of Wight today

A large commercial ship waiting for the coast of the Isle of Wight today

A large commercial ship waiting for the coast of the Isle of Wight today

A large commercial ship waiting for the coast of the Isle of Wight today

A large commercial ship waiting for the coast of the Isle of Wight today

A large commercial ship waiting for the coast of the Isle of Wight today

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